Laura A. Diaz ……………………………Teach Write

TEACHER, AUTHOR, EDUblogger "I want to (read and) write books that unblock the traffic jam in everyone's mind." ~J. Updike

The art of the metaphor – Jane Hirshfield


LESSON PLAN FOR TEACHING 6TH GRADE  FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

The art of the metaphor – Jane Hirshfield

Lesson created by Laura Diaz using

 

Video from TED-Ed YouTube Channel

Let’s Begin…

Intro:  6th Grade/ Figurative Language: How do metaphors help us better understand the world? And, what makes a good metaphor? Explore these questions with writers like Langston Hughes and Carl Sandburg, who have mastered the art of bringing a scene or emotion to life.

This link will take you to the complete TED Ed lesson I created.

For now, watch this clip and take a peek at some sample questions in the lesson:

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

(1)

The speaker says that a metaphor is almost never factually true, but still can be “right” or  not. Her example is that “We know what it feels like to be a square wheel but not what it feels like to be a tired whale.” What do you think it means to say “I feel like a square wheel”?  Can you describe that feeling in ordinary language, without using any images?

(2)

The speaker (a poet, you won’t be surprised to hear) says poems are good places to find metaphors, and that when you read a poem about a cricket singing from a branch in the middle of a river, you will recognize that that image says something larger about our human lives and how we live them. That  might  seem a lot to put into a cricket. Do you think that a description of a cricket would be read the same way or mean the same thing if it had been in a science paper about crickets instead of a poem?  Do we read things in different ways at different times, and can you say why a person might want to read a poem (or listen to the words of a song) at all?

(3)

You might like using metaphors when you write and talk because

a    It invites what you say into the reader’s senses, not just their minds
b   A good metaphor lets you think and feel in a different way
c    It lets you say things that aren’t factually true yet still have meaning
d    People can draw cool pictures of the things you say if they want to
e     All of the above
(4)

A simile is

a    A way to let people know you’re happy
b    A particular kind of metaphor
c    A phrase that compares two things using “like” or “as”
d    An elephant in the room
e    Both B and C
(5)

“An elephant in the room” is a way of saying

a    Your house is a zoo
b    You like to eat peanuts
c    You might want to buy some moisturizer
d    You and everyone else know something that no one is mentioning
e    You need a bigger bedroom
(6)

A metaphor is

a    A way of talking about one thing by describing it in terms of another
b    A take-out sandwich with meat in it
c    A fact
d    A way to confuse people
e    Always about a strong human emotion
(7)
Discussion Question(s):

Can you think of a day that you have never used even one metaphor to describe something in your life?

Would you rather live in a world where metaphors are NOT used?  Why or Why not?

The speaker says that a metaphor is almost never factually true, but still can be “right” or  not. Her example is that “We know what it feels like to be a square wheel but not what it feels like to be a tired whale.” What do you think it means to say “I feel like a square wheel”? 

Can you describe that feeling in ordinary language, without using any images?

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

An example of an end of unit Assesment Project would be for the class to collaborate on making a “Metaphor Rap.”

Similar to what Mr. John Honish has done for his flipped classroom.

Watch his:

Published on Apr 17, 2013           

Swagriculture Productions, Mr. Honish and Ms. Clarke, present a parody of the song “Thrift Shop” that teaches Figurative Language to the students at Turner Middle School.

You can subscribe to his YouTube channel to see more of his cool ideas! 🙂

    I am excited to try this one out.  Drop me a note and let me know your thoughts.  🙂
    Happy Reading, Happy Viewing, Happy Teaching! 😉
    Advertisements

    2 comments on “The art of the metaphor – Jane Hirshfield

    1. Victor.D's
      July 8, 2014

      Excellent post. Very useful info 🙂 Thank you and best of luck.

      Like

    2. David
      January 4, 2014

      This is really good. I follow your book on WATT pad. I’m addicted to it and wondering when you gonna post more. Write! 😉

      Like

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    Follow Laura A. Diaz ……………………………Teach Write on WordPress.com

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 3,479 other followers

    %d bloggers like this: